Please post your science process skills in this section. Please name them by their title.


Sorting & Classifying


Title:

Organize that Mess!



Created By: Hannah Mottern & Laura Stone

Links to Science Process Skills:
Observation, Classifying, Recording Data, Comparing and Contrasting

Links to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study:
Kindergarten Competency Goal 3, First Grade 3.03

Materials List:
-One clear zip-lock bag
-Wooden spool with no thread
-Popsicle stick
-Metal garden hose nozzle
-Translucent piping
-Sheet of bubble wrap
-Key
-Piece of quartz
-Long screw
-Wooden Clothes Pen

Basic Description of the Center:
We decided to title this science center “Organize that mess!” because in essence this is what the students will be doing in this science center. We have created a bag of items that have lots of things in common with one another. For example, the sheet of bubble wrap, the piece of quartz, and the piping are all see through or the scientific term translucent. The card that belongs with the center uses a little story about messy Pam to catch the students’ attention and to explain to the students what they need to do at the center. The students will take the items out of the bag and work together in pairs to separate these items into three groups. All the objects in each of the groups must have something in common. They can be separated by their textures, elements they are made of, properties that define them, etc. A worksheet will provided at the center for the students to draw the objects that belong together in a group and the worksheet also has a place for the students to write what the objects have in common. Once the worksheet has been completed by the students, they are then required to expand their thought process about the objects in the bag. They are asked to brainstorm and find something that all of the objects have in common. We believe this center will get the students really involved and they will be constructing knowledge about separating objects by their properties.

Specific Wording of the Card that goes with the Center:
Pam has a drawer full of lots of junk. She bought an organizer with three compartments to put her junk in. She wants to put objects that have something in common in each compartment. Will you help Pam organize her junk into three categories? Can you think of one category that all of Pam’s junk would fit into?
Note to Teachers: You will need to go over the directions on the card with the students. You may even want create a small example to show the students what you want them to do at the science center.

Item Organizer Worksheet: Draw the items that you would put into each compartment of Pam’s organizer. In the arrows next to the circles, write what the objects have in common with one another.



Science Process Skills Center

5 Senses


Title: Guess Who? What?
Grade Level: Kindergarten


Created by: Miranda Bass & Michelle Perault

Links to Science Process Skills:
This center uses observation because students are using four of their five senses to draw conclusions about what is in the covered boxes. The students are using inference by using their senses they are making educated statements about the materials in the boxes but they cannot prove what is in the box. In their science journals, the students are recording data that they have gathered from the center. Predicting is also a part of this center because students are using their senses to try and predict what material is in the covered boxes.

Links to North Carolina Standard Course of Study:
This Process Skill is great for Kindergarten because the students begin learning about their 5 senses and how they can use them to determine what an object may be. This Process Skill gets students to observe the physical properties objects obtain and gets the students to describe how the objects are.

Competency Goal 3: The learner will build an understanding of the properties/ movement of common objects and organisms.
Objectives: 3.01- Describe objects in terms of the materials they are made of
(clay, metal, cloth, paper, etc.) their physical properties (color,
size, shape, weight, texture, flexibility), and how they are used.
3.02- Describe how look, feel, smell, taste, and sound using all the
senses.

Materials List: 3 shoes boxes (or one for each object)
1 large black trash bag
duct tape
1 box of spaghetti noodles cooked
1 bag of gummy warms
1 bag of bubble gum (individually wrapped pieces)
1 small bag of sand
2 rocks
scissors
construction paper
1 extra shoe box to cut sides apart and divide sections in additional 3 shoes boxes
marker
science journal
pencil
list of descriptive words



Basic Description of Center:
First, the teacher should plan what she will have in each box and how many boxes she will need. Then, make a list of materials needed. Using old shoe boxes, divide them with a piece of cardboard or paper to make two compartments within one box. This will save you space and time. Then, select the material you want in each compartment and fill it. (If you plan on using a material that is in small pieces like sand, make sure to line the inside of the boxes so none seeps out through the cracks. Also, consider the items you are placing in the boxes. Will they get stale, or dry out? If so, plan ahead.) Then, precut hand holes in pieces of black trash bags before putting the plastic on top of the box. Then, place the trash bag pieces overtop the boxes and use tape to secure the ends. Lastly, use whatever materials you have on hand to decorate your boxes. Construction paper works great.

Specific wording of the card that goes with the center:
Timmy is on a hunt in his bedroom for something to take for Show-and-Tell. The power in his house has gone out, so everything is dark. Timmy must rely on four senses: touch, smell, hearing, and taste, to find what he is looking for. Use your senses to make predictions in your science journals of what Timmy’s hands have come across. By placing your hand in each box, chart properties of the materials you find along with the senses you used. Feel free to shake the materials so you can hear the sound they make and don’t forget to use your nose!

Any handouts that would go with center:
The only materials needed are the information card and the student’s science journals.

Digital Picture of at least one of your classmates using the center:
TBA


Created by: Lindsay Montanarella and Charity Norris
Forces and Motion
Title: What causes movement?
Links to Science Process Skills: Observation is used when the students have to see the movement of the slinky in order to observe what happens to it. Students will use inference when they try to reason the movements of the slinky by what they see. The students will record their data of what they observed. The students will predict what will happen when the slinky is moved in different ways.
Links to North Carolina Standard Course of Study: Grade 1: Competency Goal 4: The learner will make observations and conduct investigations to build an understanding of balance, motion, and weighing objects. Objectives 4.01: Describe different ways in which objects can be moved. 4.02: Observe that movement of an object can be affected by pushing or pulling. 4.03: Investigate and observe that objects can move steadily or change direction.
Materials Lists: slinky
Basic Description of Center: This center allows students to observe the movements of a slinky and record their observations. The will proceed through a series of motions to observe the reaction of the slinky. They will first experience the pushing and pulling aspect of a slinky and the reaction it has to the student’s movement. Then they will predict what will occur if the move the slinky from side to side in a snake-like motion. After recording their inference, they will proceed with the movement to find what happens. The students will make predictions of what would happen if the slinky were to be moved in different directions and angles.
Specific Wording of the Card that Goes with the Center:
Pick up the slinky and hold it for a second while you look at it. Observe how the slinky feels and the way it moves in your hand. Then predict what the slinky will do if you pull on the slinky. What will it do when you move it on the desk like a snake? What will it do if one person holds an end of the slinky and one person gives the other end a “push?” Record your predictions and then do the actual actions with the slinky and see what happens. Write down the results of the movements. Put your data into a chart.


Static Electricity by Sloane Williams and Amanda Swanson
Title: Why do we keep shocking each other?
Link to Science Process Skills:
Observation: Students will observe what occurs when the balloon or the ruler is rubbed with the felt.
Inference: Students will make guesses as to why the different scenarios occur.
Recording Data: Students will draw pictures of what they see when they perform the experiments.
Predicting: Students will begin the center by predicting what will happen when they do the center.
Comparing and Contrasting: When the students perform the “Hair-Raising Fun!” activity, they will try the activity without rubbing the felt on the balloon and then with rubbing the felt on the balloon and they will see if there is a difference.
Communicating: The students will work together to do the activities, so they will be talking to each other and discussing the activities.
North Carolina Standard Course of Study:
Competency Goal 3: The learner will make observations and conduct investigations to build an understanding of magnetism and electricity.
Materials:
Balloons
Felt
Plastic Ruler
Paper scraps/Confetti
Trash can (for discarded balloons and paper)
Twist tie (for young children)
Small Mirror
Basic Description of the Center:
In this center, the students will experiment with a few ways to create static electricity. This center has three specific activities to do. First, the students will use the felt to rub the ruler, this will create static. After rubbing the ruler 10 times, hold the ruler over the paper scraps. The students will watch what happens and draw pictures of what happens. The second activity requires the students to blow up a balloon and tie it (either with the twist tie or by just tying the balloon). Once they have blown up the balloon, they will rub the balloon on their partners hair and record what occurs. Then they will try the same activity again, but this time they will rub the balloon with the felt before rubbing their partner’s head and then record their findings. In the last part of the activity, the students will rub the balloon with the felt and try to stick the balloon to the wall. Then they will record what happens. After this activity is finished, the students will ponder; Why do these things happen? What other instances of static electricity have you seen? And what other things could you rub with the felt to create static electricity?

Cards:
Introduction Card:
[ I wrote this one from my own personal experiences, you can write one using a time when you felt static electricity]
The other day I was getting out of the car and I got shocked! A little while later, I shocked my mom! Why do I keep shocking people?
Complete the following activities to see if you can figure out why I kept shocking things. Follow the directions on the cards and record your data in your science journal.
Dancing Paper:
Do This:
1. Take a handful of paper scraps.
2. Lay the paper scraps on the table.
3. Rub the ruler back and forth with the fabric 10 times.
4. Hold the ruler over the paper scraps.
5. Draw a picture of what happens in your science notebook.
Hair Raising Fun:
Do This:
1. Inflate a balloon and then tie it off with the twist tie (or just tie the balloon).
2. Rub the balloon on your hair.
3. Hold the balloon a few inches away from your head.
4. Look in the mirror and smile!
5. Draw a picture of what happens in your science notebook.

Handouts:
No handouts are necessary unless this builds on an upcoming unit. If there is a unit following this activity (since this center was a combination of a few centers) there is a handout attached that gives some more experiments the children can do.
Resources:
Flagg, Ann. “Pocketful of Science.” The Mailbox Dec./Jan. 1996-97



What Do Our Thumbs Do?
Created by: Renée Hennings


Process Skills Used:
Inference will play a role in this activity. Students will be asked to complete certain activities and then think about how hard or easy these activities are using their thumbs. From their observations, students will discuss with a partner or group why they think certain activities are harder or easier than others.
Recording Data is another process skill that will be used in this activity. As students complete each activity they are required to make a check mark in the appropriate column describing if the activity was “easy”, “hard” or “very hard”.
NCSCOS:
Competency Goal 4: The learner will conduct investigations and use appropriate technology to build and understanding of the form and function of the skeletal and muscle systems of the body
Grade Level: Third
Objective 4.03: Describe the functions of different types of joints:
-Hinge
-Ball and socket
-Gliding

Materials:
Scissors
Pair of Pants (for Zipper and Button)
Belt
Book
Crayons
Multiple sheets of paper
Pen or Pencil
Shoe
Scotch Tape
Recording Sheet

Basic Description of Center:
During the center, students will either partner up or group up into small groups of 3 or 4 students. Each student needs a copy of the Recording Sheet and a pencil or pen to use to record data. The center should be set up with all materials clearly displayed on the table so that students can complete the necessary tasks. Students should refer to card for specific instructions for the center. The first task students need to complete is taping up their own fingers with scotch tape. Next, students are to undo the tape on their own fingers, and tape their partner’s fingers. Following this activity, students need to hold a pencil with using their thumbs. Students then can use crayons to shade the picture found on the worksheet without using their thumbs. Next, students are to trace the maze on the worksheet while not using their thumbs. Following that activity, students will work a zipper on a pair of pants, work a button on a pair of pants and tie a shoe, all without using their thumbs. Students then need to turn pages in a book and buckle a belt, both without using their thumbs. Additional tasks include writing one’s name on a sheet of paper, cutting the name out of the paper using scissors, clicking a pen and picking up a book. As students complete tasks, students should check the corresponding boxes that show how they felt about the activity. They will be asked to think about why they chose to classify a particular task as “easy”, “hard” or “very hard”. A brief list of questions will be on the card at the center to help students get started with their conversations.
Specific Wording of the Card that goes with the Center:
Have you ever thought about living day to day without a thumb? How do you think life would be altered if you did not have the gliding joint that we call our thumb? The human thumb is part of a gliding joint. Gliding Joints allow for gliding movements between flat surfaces as the surfaces slide over one another. Be sure to keep gliding joints in mind as you complete this center.
The following activity is a series of many day-to-day tasks that I will ask you to complete, while paying special attention to the use of your thumbs! After you and a partner finish each activity, please make sure to check on your recording sheet if each activity was “easy”, “hard” or “very hard” based on how hard your thumb(s) worked. After you and your partner finish the activities, discuss with each other, or in your small groups why you chose the result you did. Here are a few questions to help you get started:

1) Would any of these particular activities be hard without a thumb? Why?
2) What do you think is the function of the thumb?
3) How do you think the gliding joint plays a part in thumbs?



Electricity & Magnetism


Title: What Goes With the Flow??

Created by: Erin Huffman & Hannah Milstead

North Carolina Standard Course of Study: Grade 4 Competency Goal 3
Objectives:
3.01: Observe and investigate the pull of magnets on all materials made of iron and the pushes or pulls on other magnets.
3.03: Design and test an electric circuit as a closed pathway including an energy source, energy conductor, and an energy receiver.
3.06: Describe and identify materials that are conductors and nonconductors of electricity.


Links to Process Skills


Observation:
Ask students what is similar and different about the magnetic objects. They will also be observing the flow of electricity and the flow of electrons with the magnets.
Inference:
Why do you think that lights turn on and off when you turn the switch back and forth? Why do you think some objects are magnetic and some are not?
Classifying:
What do the objects have in common and what do they have that are different? Which objects are conductors and insulators?
Measuring:
Which magnetic objects have a stronger pull? (hypothesis)
Recording Data:
The students will write down their observations during the magnetic presentation on a piece of notebook paper. The students will write down their observations during electricity presentation. The students will record their observations during the presentation on conductors and insulators.
Predicting:
Which objects are conductors and which ones are insulators? Why does electricity cut off and on when you turn the switch to a light? Which objects will the magnet be attracted to?
Comparing and Contrasting:
Students will identify similarities and differences between the objects dealing with magnetism.

Planning an Investigation:
Materials Needed:
  • Electricity- 6V battery, Copper coated plastic wire (1 foot) , 6V socket, 6V light bulb
  • Magnetism- plastic, rubber, paper, aluminum can or aluminum foil, small block of wood, pencil lead, coins, scissors, metal washer, key ring and keys, paperclips
Procedure:
Magnets:
1. First, observe the different bags of objects.
2. Write down the objects that you think are magnetic and which are not.
3. Test your objects.
4. Make a graph to display your findings. Rank them in order by strongest magnetic pull.
Electric Pathway:
1. Identify the energy source, energy conductor, and energy receiver
2. Make a diagram to label the following parts of this experiment: battery (positive and negative ends), copper wire, light bulb and socket, switch
3. How do you think the switch controls power to the light bulb?
4. Show this in your diagram

Conductors and Insulators:
1. Test each object to see if the object is a conductor or an insulator. The conductors will cause the bulb to light, the insulators will not.
2. Make two columns to show your findings
3. How are these two columns similar and how are they different?
The variables that we will be changing are the conductors and insulators.

Materials List

  • 6V Battery
  • Copper Coated Plastic Wire (1 foot)
  • 6V Socket
  • 6V Light Bulb
  • Plastic
  • Rubber
  • Paper
  • Aluminum Can
  • Small block of wood
  • Pencil Lead
  • Coins
  • Scissors
  • Metal Washer
  • Key Ring and Keys
  • Paperclips

Description of Center


This center deals with magnetism, the flow of electricity, and conductors and insulators. There will be three separate stations within the center to build information on magnetism and electricity.
The first station will focus on magnets. The teacher should provide bags with a variety of objects that will demonstrate the pull and push of magnets and those that will not. There will be a small magnet by the objects for students to test their guesses. Students will record their hypothesis and their findings. Students will rank the objects with the strongest magnetic pull.
The second station involves the battery, wire, switch, light bulb and socket. This display illustrates an electric circuit. Instructions for setting up this display can be found on the sources page. Students will draw a diagram of what they observe. The focus of this station is to demonstrate how a switch disrupts the flow of electricity.
The third station will contain two bags of objects. One bag will contain different types of conductors. The other bag will include insulators. Using the display from station two, students will test objects to discover if (when they are connected to the copper wire) they conduct electricity. Students will begin to see a pattern in the objects that are conductors and the objects that are insulators.


Center Instructions


Magnets:
  1. First, observe the different bags of objects.
  2. Write down the objects that you think are magnetic and which are not.
  3. Test your objects.
  4. Make a graph to display your findings. Rank them in order by strongest magnetic pull.
Electric Pathway:
  1. Identify the energy source, energy conductor, and energy receiver
  2. Make a diagram to label the following parts of this experiment: battery (positive and negative ends), copper wire, light bulb and socket, switch
  3. How do you think the switch controls power to the light bulb?
  4. Show this in your diagram.
Conductors and Insulators:__
  1. Test each object to see if the object is a conductor or an insulator. The conductors will cause the bulb to light, the insulators will not.
  2. Make two columns to show your findings
  3. How are these two columns similar and how are they different.


Sources



All about conductors and insulators-
http://www.rare-earth-magnets.com/magnet_university/conductors_and_insulators.htm

How to make a closed circuit electric pathway with an energy source, energy conductor, and an energy receiver-
http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/projects/open-short-circuit.html

How to conduct electricity from a lemon-
http://www.miamisci.org/af/sln/wolfman/fruity.html

All about magnets-
http://www.factmonster.com/ce6/sci/A0859426.html

A GREAT kid friendly website that explains circuits, conductors, insulators, electric pathways, and switches-
http://www.andythelwell.com/blobz/